Washing Cars With Hot Water: Is It Safe For Your Vehicle?


I'm part of Amazon Associate and some other affiliate programs, If you buy through links on this site, I may earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. Learn More


is it safe to wash a car with hot water

Hot water helps us all a lot inside and around our house, especially when cleaning all kinds of dirt. Logically, you may think about washing your dirty car with hot water too. However, washing your car with hot water may not be safe for your vehicle, and today, I’ll discuss this topic.

You should never wash your car with hot water, especially in the winter period. You should wash vehicles only with moderately warm water or with cold water. 

As you can see, washing a car with hot water isn’t safe for your vehicle and car protectants such as waxes and sealants. And that’s the reason why I’m writing this article.

I want to dive deeper into the topic of safe water temperatures for car washing and show you precisely what you should pay attention to and what temperatures are best for a safe and efficient car wash.

Hot Water Cleans Dirt With Ease, BUT…

Hot water is a fantastic cleaner, especially when paired with some car wash products. However, it would be best if you didn’t ever use it for washing vehicles.

There are many reasons why you should avoid using hot water when washing cars, here are the most important ones:

  1. It isn’t suitable for car paint: if used together with a high-pressure washer, it can destroy car paint more quickly than cold water, resulting in rust.
  2. Hot water breaks up waxes and sealants: car paint protectants are resistant to temperatures, but only to a certain level. Hot water will break them, which leaves your car’s finish unprotected.
  3. Car windows may break: Washing your vehicle during the winter period, and using hot water, may lead to windows cracking because of the big temperature difference. 
  4. It’s too hot for your hands: using hot water inside your car wash buckets is a mission impossible. It’ll quickly burn your skin.
  5. Hot water destroys microfiber cloths: you’ll spend too much money on ordering new wash mitts because the fibers in the old ones will melt from hot water. 
  6. You may lose car stickers: if you have some stickers on your vehicle, hot water may melt the glue beneath, and they will probably fall off. 

I think that these six reasons are more than enough explanations of why you shouldn’t use hot water when washing cars, motorcycles, RVs, trucks, etc. 

Warm Water Is The King

Warm water is the king in the auto detailing world. You should always aim to wash cars with warm water since it’s warm enough to lift the vehicle’s dirt quickly but is still safe enough for car paint, tools, and protectants.

The ideal water temperature for washing cars is anywhere between 100-130 degrees Fahrenheit. The water temperature shouldn’t exceed 140 degrees Fahrenheit.

Every self-service car wash has warm water, and that’s with reason. It just lifts the dirt from the vehicle better, and together with high-pressure washers, it’s a win-win. 

Warm water could be a great addon to speed up your car detailing tasks, but it’s not crucial for washing vehicles. 

It can be pretty expensive to install a dedicated car wash boiler for your auto detailing garage. So, if you’re not a professional detailer, I think there’s no need to buy boilers. There’s no ROI that way.

Most People Still Use Cold Water

Even though warm water is the best solution for washing vehicles, many people still use cold water to wash their cars. That’s because it’s hard to implement water boilers inside a garage or the water system outside of the house.

For instance, mobile detailers don’t have any chance of implementing water systems in their mobile detailing setups, and even without warm water, they get great results for washing vehicles.

“Warm water is better, but cold water will do the job. In the end, if you have great knowledge and experience, together with high-quality products, you’ll always get perfect cleaning results, even with cold water only.”

If you follow the main principles of washing vehicles correctly, you’ll wash cars without any problems, regardless of the warm or cold water you use for washing.

Check my article to see the exact steps for washing your vehicle the right way (click here).

I said that the ideal water temperature for washing vehicles is between 100-130 degrees Fahrenheit. However, any temperature between 50-130 degrees Fahrenheit is good and will wash cars properly.

You Can Use Warm Water Inside Car Wash Buckets

warm water inside bucket for washing car

There’s one thing that you can always do to improve the effectiveness of car wash shampoos, and that’s by using warm water inside your car wash buckets.

When washing with the three-bucket system, fill buckets with warm water instead of cold water. That way, when doing a contact wash, you’ll easier lift the dirt from the vehicles, and you’ll get slightly better results.

That’s how I do it sometimes (for extremely dirty vehicles), and I find it quick and easy. So, it shouldn’t be a problem at all.

That’s also a perfect method when you’re washing cars during the winter period, especially in below-freezing temperatures. Water will be warm so that it won’t hurt your hands, and you’ll be able to work all day. 

So, for contactless wash (pre-wash, foam, rinsing, etc.) – use cold water. For contact wash (buckets and wash mitts) – use warm water. That’s the easiest way to work quickly and get fantastic results.

Conclusion

As you could see, you should avoid washing cars with hot water. Instead, use warm water if possible. If not, don’t worry, you are perfectly fine with cold water too.

If you’re a professional car detailer, who works in his garage, I recommend you think about buying a boiler so that you can have warm water inside your detailing garage. It will be beneficial for more things than just washing vehicles. 

However, cold water (what you already have in your house) is the best and cheapest solution for most hobbyist car detailers. 

Similar Articles:

Recent Posts